Blog

Heraldry as spring comes… A cray-cray explosion of ermine and tulips

It’s finally above 10° here in Sweden! Crocus and tulips are brightening the days and the sun offers the cheek a little warmth. Of course, me being me, I can’t help but celebrating the joy of springtime with a little heraldic fun. Today’s piece sports Ermine an “escarboucle” (or escarbounce) Or with each spoke ending … Continue reading Heraldry as spring comes… A cray-cray explosion of ermine and tulips

Speculative Genealogy – Aelfinë Sjaustiarn ( – 1480)

Photoshop and period paintings team up to create collages of my actual ancestors. Today I present one of the more enigmatic foremothers of the Princely House of Lorenzburg. Aelfinë Sjaustiarn (Sevenstar), of whom little more is known than that “she came from the forests” and that she brought great riches. She was believed to possess … Continue reading Speculative Genealogy – Aelfinë Sjaustiarn ( – 1480)

“A Royal invitation to return to Lorenzburg” – Presentation in Riga 2018

Presenting an artistic collaboration on micronationalism, narrative embroidery, speculative genealogy and epic poems at the artistic research conference NSU “ReActivate and ReVisit” – Riga/ Latvia March 2018. Collaborators: Anna Frew, Betsy Lamborn and Freï von Fräähsen zu Lorenzburg. The Battle of Wayoh (as written and told by Betsy Lamborn in the video) In the in … Continue reading “A Royal invitation to return to Lorenzburg” – Presentation in Riga 2018

Work in progress: the portrait of my foremother Agnes Pia Douglas (probably 1441 – ?)

Photoshop and period paintings team up to create collage-portraits of actual or hypothetical ancestors. Today I present the work in progress of visualizing my foremother Agnes Pia (called “little Pea”) of clan Douglas. My relative the knight Sir Runë Olausson Påfågel (1433 – 1440) was murdered while being the guest of the Clan Douglas at … Continue reading Work in progress: the portrait of my foremother Agnes Pia Douglas (probably 1441 – ?)

Badge (Coat of arms) for the office of Master/Mistress of the Mouche

Once worn to conceal a blemish or to create allure, the mouche (French word for “fly”)—and its specific placement on a woman’s face or neck—would become a language under the extravagant chief mistress to Louis XV (an official role positioning her as an arbiter of taste) and was used as a code of seductive intent. … Continue reading Badge (Coat of arms) for the office of Master/Mistress of the Mouche